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My First Transgressions

The Voice announced the departure time. The airport employee (whatever he was), said we needed to go to a next location, where we would finally be going to the plane. I looked at the wall and saw the clock. It was 8:00 am. Weird, I thought, even airports lie about departure times.

On the line toward the plane, I saw the woman I thought was an FBI agent. We smiled at each other. Then I noticed she had an extra suitcase. She asked me for help, and I couldn’t say no. In the end, and even if I never knew her name, I will always think of her as the first person who wished me luck while I was walking toward the unknown.

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Underneath: Identity

The name in the driver license is Galuri Leirbag.

He frowns, while the smoke of his Marlboro oozes through his nose. “What kind of a name is that?” The man in the picture appears to be himself, at 32 years of age in the year 2017, wearing a shorter haircut, same stubble as of that moment, and a smirk on his face that suggests he owns the world. “Too cocky,” he says, not fully realizing he’s talking about himself. The ID also says he is six feet tall and weighs one hundred and seventy-five pounds. He looks at his slender and firm body as if it were the first time he ever saw it.

How comes he doesn’t remember who he is?

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Waterless

For Matthew, every payday was a mystery. There he was, looking at the envelope his store manager gave him. He was wearing a blue, polo shirt, black pants and a black hat with the word ‘McDonald’s’ printed on it. The envelope was always the same; plain white and with his name, Matthew Lara, written on it. He looked at it, as if it was an Agatha Christie novel, which aftermath he wouldn’t know if he didn’t open it. A mystery, that is what every paycheck was. Likewise, the things he’d been doing for almost a year were a mystery. Even to himself.

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Book of the Month

Gabriel Lucatero

Self-published Fiction Writer

Gabriel Lucatero is a Mexican fiction writer who describes most of his work as Transgressive and Horror Fiction.