Lights Out; Redemption with a Taste for Poetry

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Eddie Nye, aka Nails during his time in prison, framed for a crime he didn’t commit, locked up for 15 years even though he did commit a couple of crimes while being inside, wants to just take a bath when he gets out; oh, he also wants to quit smoking. The character is credible, but the events that follow after he gets out, appear a bit far-fetch. 

For example, everything goes to hell in a handbasket because Nails gets a cigarette from a bad-ass drug dealer, which apparently had a hundred dollar bill wrapped in it, and that was supposed to be utilized to pay off for a prostitute with whom Nails was gonna have some fun.

I finished the book, but I still don’t understand the significance of that.

Throughout the book, Nails also has an obsession with a poem, trying to understand its meaning, and at the same time, I am trying to comprehend what does that have to do with anything; this fascination makes him look somewhat intellectual, which I guess is what the author intended to do in the first place. 

However, the story could have been better, had the author worked harder in the creation of the plot. The story feels awkward, showing a side where Eddie is looking for the truth behind his imprisonment (obviously, since this is what is supposed to be the main idea), and another side is a complicated juxtaposition of events I still find weird and hard to believe. One quick example is a moment when the prostitute tracks down Eddie out of nowhere and there is never an explanation as to how was that even possible. I mean, was she some sort of witch or seer who just happened to have a magic ball and could see Eddie’s every move?

Who knows.

I’m not trying to disparage the author, since I have read his books before and was never this confused. I’ve said before that Pressure Drop, another of his books, was my least favorite, but Lights Out has come and knocked that other novel out of the park. 

This story could have been better. Maybe the author should write it again. 

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